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image: Color from Structure

Color from Structure

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers are working to understand how often-colorless biological nanostructures give rise to some of the most spectacular technicolor displays in nature.

4 Comments

image: Killer Kittens

Killer Kittens

By | January 31, 2013

Domestic cats kill billions of birds and mammals every year, making them a top threat to US wildlife.

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image: Modeling All Life?

Modeling All Life?

By | January 28, 2013

A proposal to simulate all of Earth’s ecosystems is exposing a rift between small and big ecology.

5 Comments

image: Cities Affect Global Weather Currents

Cities Affect Global Weather Currents

By | January 28, 2013

The heat emanating from large metropolitan areas may be changing weather patterns thousands of miles away.

1 Comment

image: Stats Are Right Most of the Time

Stats Are Right Most of the Time

By | January 28, 2013

A new analysis suggests that only 14 percent of published biomedical results are wrong, despite prominent opinions to the contrary.

1 Comment

image: Cheap Impact?

Cheap Impact?

By | January 23, 2013

A new online tool allows researchers to compare open-access journal publication fees with article influence, and reveals that you don’t necessarily get what you pay for.

0 Comments

image: Mathematicians as Publishers

Mathematicians as Publishers

By | January 21, 2013

A new initiative in the mathematics research community is gearing up to do the work traditionally organized by a publisher.

0 Comments

image: Renowned Retraction

Renowned Retraction

By | January 16, 2013

Authors retract a decade-old, highly-cited cancer study, admitting sloppy mistakes in the data analysis.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Publish Negative Results

Opinion: Publish Negative Results

By , , and | January 15, 2013

Non-confirmatory or “negative” results are not worthless.

7 Comments

image: Fly Guts Reveal Animal Inventory

Fly Guts Reveal Animal Inventory

By | January 7, 2013

Stomachs of flesh-eating flies carry the DNA of animals in remote rainforests.

0 Comments

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