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image: Opinion: Reimagining the Paper

Opinion: Reimagining the Paper

By | May 2, 2016

Breaking down lengthy, narrative-driven biomedical articles into brief reports on singular observations or experiments could increase reproducibility and accessibility in the literature.

3 Comments

image: Transparency Now

Transparency Now

By | May 1, 2016

Science is messy. So lay it out, warts and all.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2016

Sorting the Beef from the Bull, Cheats and Deceits, A Sea of Glass, and Following the Wild Bees

0 Comments

image: Monkey See, Monkey Die

Monkey See, Monkey Die

By | May 1, 2016

What's killing howler monkeys in the jungles of Central America?

0 Comments

image: Silent Canopies

Silent Canopies

By | May 1, 2016

A spate of howler monkey deaths in Nicaragua, Panama, and Ecuador has researchers scrambling to identify the cause.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2016

May 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Zombie Literature

The Zombie Literature

By | May 1, 2016

Retractions are on the rise. But reams of flawed research papers persist in the scientific literature. Is it time to change the way papers are published?

9 Comments

image: Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

By | April 28, 2016

Baby fish show fewer signs of stress in the presence of large fish that scare off midsize predators. 

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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