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The Scientist

» science publishing and ecology

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image: Learning to Share

Learning to Share

By | September 29, 2014

Policies instituted by the National Institutes of Health have led to more data sharing in the life sciences, according to a new report.

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image: <em>Nature Communications</em> Goes OA

Nature Communications Goes OA

By | September 23, 2014

Starting October 20, the journal will only accept open-access research submissions, making it Nature’s first and only all-OA title.

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image: PubPeer: Pathologist Threatening to Sue Users

PubPeer: Pathologist Threatening to Sue Users

By | September 22, 2014

The forum’s founders have obtained legal counsel and are preparing for the possibility of user information being subpoenaed as part of a lawsuit.

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image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

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image: Supplemental Costs of Retractions

Supplemental Costs of Retractions

By | September 8, 2014

When a scientific paper is withdrawn from the literature it can have a spill-over effect, researchers show.

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image: Opinion: An Ecclesiastical Approach to Peer Review

Opinion: An Ecclesiastical Approach to Peer Review

By | September 5, 2014

How early Christian teachings could improve scientific discourse

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image: Deciding to Ditch Latin

Deciding to Ditch Latin

By | September 3, 2014

A report details how the International Botanical Congress agreed in favor of electronic-only publication and naming new species using English.

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image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

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image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.

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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

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