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image: Parsing Negative Citations

Parsing Negative Citations

By | October 26, 2015

A new tool helps scientists better understand what happens to studies that are criticized in the literature.

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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

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image: Crystal Unclear

Crystal Unclear

By | October 15, 2015

A behind-the-scenes look at how researchers solved the high-resolution crystal structure of the nucleosome core particle raises the age-old question of assigning credit in science.

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image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

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image: Debating the Value of Anonymity

Debating the Value of Anonymity

By | October 5, 2015

PubPeer responds to criticism that anonymous post-publication peer review threatens the scientific process.

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image: Predatory Journal Biz Booming

Predatory Journal Biz Booming

By | October 5, 2015

Scientific publishers with questionable standards raked in about $75 million and published more than 400,000 articles last year, according to a new analysis.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | October 1, 2015

October 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: TS Picks: September 29, 2015

TS Picks: September 29, 2015

By | September 29, 2015

Detailing publication contributions; mining human connectomes; all about mutations

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image: Data “Overflow” Compromising Science?

Data “Overflow” Compromising Science?

By | September 25, 2015

According to a new study, the deluge of scientific literature is leaving researchers unsure of which information to trust.

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