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Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

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Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

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image: Gambling on Reproducibility

Gambling on Reproducibility

By | November 10, 2015

New research finds that observers placing bets in a stock exchange–like environment are pretty good at predicting the replicability of psychology studies.

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image: Parsing Negative Citations

Parsing Negative Citations

By | October 26, 2015

A new tool helps scientists better understand what happens to studies that are criticized in the literature.

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Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

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Crystal Unclear

By | October 15, 2015

A behind-the-scenes look at how researchers solved the high-resolution crystal structure of the nucleosome core particle raises the age-old question of assigning credit in science.

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image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

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image: Debating the Value of Anonymity

Debating the Value of Anonymity

By | October 5, 2015

PubPeer responds to criticism that anonymous post-publication peer review threatens the scientific process.

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image: Predatory Journal Biz Booming

Predatory Journal Biz Booming

By | October 5, 2015

Scientific publishers with questionable standards raked in about $75 million and published more than 400,000 articles last year, according to a new analysis.

2 Comments

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