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image: Fascinated by Folding

Fascinated by Folding

By | August 4, 2017

Lila Gierasch uses biochemical tools to understand how linear chains of amino acids turn into complex three-dimensional structures.

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image: Do Preprints Require More Rigorous Screening?

Do Preprints Require More Rigorous Screening?

By | August 1, 2017

Two manuscripts published without methods point to the importance of community policing on preprint archives.

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image: Peer-Review Fraud Scheme Uncovered in China

Peer-Review Fraud Scheme Uncovered in China

By | July 31, 2017

The Chinese government finds almost 500 researchers guilty of misconduct in relation to a recent spate of retractions from a cancer journal.

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The genomes of two species of water bears reveal clues about how they persist in extreme conditions, yet don’t resolve the animals’ debated evolutionary story.

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A cardiovascular surgeon’s research was rejected for publication because it referenced evolutionary theory, Turkish outlets report, while the university at the center of the tumult claims the story is false. 

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Their waters served as refuges during ice ages, allowing for adaptation and the emergence of new species.

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These institutions join around 60 others that hope to put increasing pressure on the publishing giant in ongoing negotiations for a new nationwide licensing agreement.

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image: On Blacklists and Whitelists

On Blacklists and Whitelists

By | July 17, 2017

Experts debate how best to point researchers to reputable publishers and steer them away from predatory ones.

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image: Identifying Predatory Publishers

Identifying Predatory Publishers

By | July 17, 2017

How to tell reputable journals from shady ones

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The presence of similar light-emitting enzymes in the distantly related organisms lends new insight into bioluminescence evolution.

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