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image: Human Ancestors?

Human Ancestors?

By | April 11, 2013

Fossilized skeletal remains of the hominid Australopithecus sediba add to the puzzle of human evolution.

2 Comments

image: Is PubMed Hurting Scientific Journals?

Is PubMed Hurting Scientific Journals?

By | April 5, 2013

A study concludes that the open access repository is decreasing biomedical journal readership.

5 Comments

image: Week in Review: April 1-5

Week in Review: April 1-5

By | April 5, 2013

Living fossils not so fossilized; Canadian gov’t threatens scientists’ freedom to speak and publish; gene therapy for sensory disorders; an unusual theory of cancer; clues for an HIV vaccine

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image: The Falsity of Living Fossils

The Falsity of Living Fossils

By | April 2, 2013

New studies of tadpole shrimp and other organisms show that the term “living fossil” is inaccurate and misleading.

5 Comments

image: Icy Veins

Icy Veins

By | April 2, 2013

Intrepid Norwegian explorers discovered the Antarctic icefish, a marvel of evolution, while venturing to an island at the bottom of the Earth in 1927.

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image:

"White-Blooded" Icefish, 1927

By | April 1, 2013

A bizarre group of Antarctic fishes lost their red blood cells but survived to tell their evolutionary tale, revealing a fundamental lesson about the birth and death of genes.

5 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from Rough and Tumble

Book Excerpt from Rough and Tumble

By | April 1, 2013

In Chapter 3, “Tamping the Simian Urge,” author Travis Rayne Pickering contrasts the brute physicality of predatory chimpanzees with the headier hunting style employed by humans.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2013

Leopold, The Drunken Botanist, Beautiful Whale, and Between Man and Beast

0 Comments

image: The Roots of Violence

The Roots of Violence

By | April 1, 2013

Archaeology can shine needed light on the evolution of our aggressive tendencies.

6 Comments

image: Opinion: Open-Access for the 3rd World

Opinion: Open-Access for the 3rd World

By | March 21, 2013

Scientists should submit their work to open-access repositories to support research in parts of the world that don’t have access to the vast libraries of pay-wall-constrained literature.

2 Comments

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