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image: How Hummingbirds Taste Nectar

How Hummingbirds Taste Nectar

By | August 21, 2014

Hummingbirds perceive sweetness through a receptor with which other vertebrates taste savory foods. 

1 Comment

image: Obscured Like an Octopus

Obscured Like an Octopus

By | August 21, 2014

Cephalopod skin inspires engineers to design sheets of adaptive camouflage sensors. 

0 Comments

image: PubPeer Threatened with Legal Action

PubPeer Threatened with Legal Action

By | August 19, 2014

The moderators of the post-publication peer review forum say they could be facing their first legal case.

2 Comments

image: Article Add-ons

Article Add-ons

By | August 14, 2014

eLife introduces a new article format that allows authors to update their publications as new methods, data, or analyses become available.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: OA Advocates Slam <em>Science Advances</em>

Opinion: OA Advocates Slam Science Advances

By | August 13, 2014

Proponents of open-access publishing question the newly announced terms of publishing in the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s forthcoming journal.

0 Comments

image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Accomplishments Over Accolades

Opinion: Accomplishments Over Accolades

By | August 11, 2014

Award-seeking and career-building behavior is contributing to the rise of bad science. 

9 Comments

image: Microbes in a Tar Pit

Microbes in a Tar Pit

By | August 8, 2014

Microdroplets of water in a natural asphalt lake are home to active microbial life, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: How Tinier Theropods Took Flight

How Tinier Theropods Took Flight

By | August 4, 2014

Downsizing dinosaurs was key to the evolution of birds, a study shows. 

0 Comments

image: Cephalopod Coddling

Cephalopod Coddling

By | August 1, 2014

Deep-sea octopus has the longest-known brooding period known for any animal species.

0 Comments

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