The Scientist

» science publishing and evolution

Most Recent

image: Opinion: Reviewing Reviewers

Opinion: Reviewing Reviewers

By | July 19, 2013

Science needs a standard way to evaluate and reward journal reviewers.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review, July 15–19

Week in Review, July 15–19

By | July 19, 2013

Bias in preclinical research; medical marijuana for kids; a swath of microbial genomes; plastic ocean habitats; rethinking scientific evaluation


image: A Big-Nosed Horn-Faced Dino

A Big-Nosed Horn-Faced Dino

By | July 18, 2013

The discovery of a new species of horned dinosaur supports the idea that similar but separate species evolved on the same landmass thanks to a natural barrier.  

1 Comment

image: Lost in Translation

Lost in Translation

By | July 16, 2013

Failure to translate preclinical research to humans may be due in part to biased reporting.


image: Opinion: Rethinking Scientific Evaluation

Opinion: Rethinking Scientific Evaluation

By | July 16, 2013

Asymmetry in the Research Excellence Framework in the U.K. is a threat to basic medical sciences within British medical schools.


image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism


image: Editor Quits After Fraud Allegations

Editor Quits After Fraud Allegations

By | July 10, 2013

Dmitry Kuznetsov, former chief editor of two science journals, denies any wrongdoing, but agrees to leave his posts after The Scientist reported on numerous accusations of misconduct.


image: Week in Review, July 1–5

Week in Review, July 1–5

By | July 5, 2013

Fraudulent journal editor?; fat cells detect temp, generate heat; the importance of social media in science communication; functional livers from iPSCs; antibiotics damage mitochondria


image: Accused “Fraudster” Heads Two Journals

Accused “Fraudster” Heads Two Journals

By | July 2, 2013

A Russian researcher suspected of multiple counts of fakery is chief editor of two scientific publications.

1 Comment

image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.



Popular Now

  1. Sex Differences in the Brain
    Features Sex Differences in the Brain

    How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.

  2. Brain Gain
    Features Brain Gain

    Young neurons in the adult human brain are likely critical to its function.

  3. Antiparasite Drug Developers Win Nobel
    Daily News Antiparasite Drug Developers Win Nobel

    William Campbell, Satoshi Omura, and Youyou Tu have won this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in recognition of their contributions to antiparasitic drug development.

  4. Riboswitch Flip Kills Bacteria
INTEGRA Biosciences
INTEGRA Biosciences
Life Technologies