Advertisement

The Scientist

» science publishing and evolution

Most Recent

image: Snake Tales

Snake Tales

By | March 1, 2012

An anthropologist and a herpetologist join forces to reveal the complex shared evolutionary and ecological history of pythons and primates.

8 Comments

image: Anti-Open Access Bill Dies

Anti-Open Access Bill Dies

By | February 29, 2012

Legislators have dropped the Research Works Act, which would have nixed policies that require federally funded research findings to be deposited in public databases.

0 Comments

image: Elsevier Abandons Anti-Open Access Bill

Elsevier Abandons Anti-Open Access Bill

By | February 28, 2012

The publishing giant withdraws its support of the Research Works Act, which would eliminate open-access requirements on federally funded work.

18 Comments

image: Long Live the Y

Long Live the Y

By | February 22, 2012

Despite suggestions to the contrary, the Y chromosome is not necessarily rotting away.

8 Comments

image: Bird Flu Paper Publication Delayed

Bird Flu Paper Publication Delayed

By | February 17, 2012

The World Health Organization announced today that it recommends publishing the two controversial H5N1 papers in full, as soon as a few details are worked out. And Science is listening.

6 Comments

image: Boozing for Better Health

Boozing for Better Health

By | February 16, 2012

Fruit flies consume alcohol to kill off parasites.

12 Comments

image: Opinion: What Is Life?

Opinion: What Is Life?

By | February 16, 2012

Designing the simplest possible living organism artificially may lend clues as to what life is.

100 Comments

image: Open Access for All?

Open Access for All?

By | February 14, 2012

New legislation would make all federally funded research publicly available within 6 months of publication.

2 Comments

image: Darwin Day Celebrations

Darwin Day Celebrations

By | February 13, 2012

As institutions around the world start celebrations of Darwin Day, New York reveals a digitized catalog of Darwin’s scientific manuscripts.

29 Comments

image: How the Zebra Got Its Stripes

How the Zebra Got Its Stripes

By | February 9, 2012

Zebras may have evolved their striped coat to avoid blood-sucking flies.

24 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Horizon Discovery
Horizon Discovery
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist
Life Technologies