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image: The Year in Science Publishing

The Year in Science Publishing

By | December 30, 2013

From the launch of preprint servers and post-publication peer review platforms to shakeups within the open-access movement, science publishing saw much change in 2013.

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image: Top 10 Retractions of 2013

Top 10 Retractions of 2013

By | December 30, 2013

A look at this year’s most memorable retractions

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image: Top Genomes of 2013

Top Genomes of 2013

By | December 26, 2013

What researchers learned as they dug through the most highly cited genomes published this year

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image: Top Scientists of 2013

Top Scientists of 2013

By | December 25, 2013

The Scientist commemorates prize-winning life scientists and remembers notable researchers who died this year.

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image: Raw Data’s Vanishing Act

Raw Data’s Vanishing Act

By | December 23, 2013

As scientific publications age, the data that undergird them are disappearing at an alarming rate.

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image: Cancer Pioneer Dies

Cancer Pioneer Dies

By | December 20, 2013

Janet Rowley, who earned fame for linking chromosomal abnormalities to cancer in the 1970s, has passed away at age 88 from ovarian cancer.

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image: Defining Legit Open Access Journals

Defining Legit Open Access Journals

By | December 20, 2013

Scholarly publishing organizations join forces to set standards for aboveboard open access journals.  

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image: Week in Review: December 16–20

Week in Review: December 16–20

By | December 20, 2013

Sex lives of early hominins; Amborella trichopoda genome; surface topography and stem cells; how HIV weakens immune cells; dogs, dust microbes, and mouse allergies; news from ASCB

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image: Understanding Lyme

Understanding Lyme

By | December 19, 2013

Researchers show that a protein expressed in the bacterium that causes Lyme disease is necessary for both parts of the organism’s life cycle.

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image: On The Origin of Flowers

On The Origin of Flowers

By | December 19, 2013

The genome of Amborella trichopoda—the sister species of all flowering plants—provides clues about this group’s rise to power.

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