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image: Citation Payola?

Citation Payola?

By | August 18, 2015

A transgenic mouse company is paying researchers who mention its animal models in scientific papers.

1 Comment

image: BMC Revises Retraction

BMC Revises Retraction

By | August 13, 2015

BioMed Central updates a retraction notice issued in March after finding out the authors did not influence the peer-review process.

0 Comments

image: Publishing Partners

Publishing Partners

By | August 10, 2015

Collaborations can boost citations, a study shows.

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image: Keeping Science Pubs Clean

Keeping Science Pubs Clean

By | June 29, 2015

Science releases new guidelines for research transparency, hoping to stem the tide of retractions and misconduct.

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image: Opinion: Too Many Mitochondrial Genome Papers

Opinion: Too Many Mitochondrial Genome Papers

By | June 29, 2015

And too few insights gleaned from them

4 Comments

image: TS Picks: June 16, 2015

TS Picks: June 16, 2015

By | June 16, 2015

Science publishing edition

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image: Batch Effect Behind Species-Specific Results?

Batch Effect Behind Species-Specific Results?

By | May 19, 2015

Reanalysis of Mouse ENCODE data suggests mouse and human genes are expressed in tissue-specific, rather than species-specific, patterns. 

1 Comment

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2015

May 2015's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: WHO: Share Trial Data

WHO: Share Trial Data

By | April 15, 2015

The World Health Organization again calls upon researchers to register clinical trial details in freely accessible databases before initiation of the study.

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image: Opinion: Senior Scientists Should Be Writing

Opinion: Senior Scientists Should Be Writing

By | April 7, 2015

Three reasons why authorship matters, even—perhaps especially—to established scholars

6 Comments

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