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image: Do Innocent Errors Cause Most Retractions?

Do Innocent Errors Cause Most Retractions?

By | November 2, 2012

Contrary to previous studies, a new publication finds that most retractions from scholarly literature are not due to misconduct.  

3 Comments

image: Retraction Backlash

Retraction Backlash

By | November 1, 2012

Retracting a paper from the scientific literature can lead to fewer citations for related studies.  

0 Comments

image: Publishing’s Gender Gap

Publishing’s Gender Gap

By | October 23, 2012

Female scholars are gaining ground in publishing, but cluster in sub-disciplines and tend not to be listed as first or last authors.

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image: The Benefits of Rejection

The Benefits of Rejection

By | October 11, 2012

A survey of the prepublication histories of papers reveals that manuscripts that are rejected then resubmitted are cited more often.

5 Comments

image: Scientists Review Own Papers

Scientists Review Own Papers

By | October 3, 2012

In the latest effort to boost publication records, researchers are writing positive peer reviews for their work under other scientists’ names.

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image: Pay-per-Article and Save

Pay-per-Article and Save

By | September 27, 2012

In a pilot program at the University of Utah, the library pays for readers to rent or buy research individual articles, avoiding expensive journal subscriptions.

2 Comments

image: University Library Ditches ACS

University Library Ditches ACS

By | September 18, 2012

In protest against high-priced journal packages, the library at SUNY Potsdam will end its subscription to American Chemical Society online journal package.

0 Comments

image: Scientists

Scientists "Spin" Results

By | September 13, 2012

A new study of the scientific literature finds that researchers are guilty of overemphasizing the benefits of medical treatments.

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image: Predicting Publishing Futures

Predicting Publishing Futures

By | September 12, 2012

Researchers measure scientific output to determine if past success predicts future productivity.

6 Comments

image: Tracking Research Productivity

Tracking Research Productivity

By | September 4, 2012

Thomson Reuters teams up with several North American universities to use a customized evaluation tool that analyses research impact on an institutional level.

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