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image: Stats Are Right Most of the Time

Stats Are Right Most of the Time

By | January 28, 2013

A new analysis suggests that only 14 percent of published biomedical results are wrong, despite prominent opinions to the contrary.

1 Comment

image: Cheap Impact?

Cheap Impact?

By | January 23, 2013

A new online tool allows researchers to compare open-access journal publication fees with article influence, and reveals that you don’t necessarily get what you pay for.

0 Comments

image: Mathematicians as Publishers

Mathematicians as Publishers

By | January 21, 2013

A new initiative in the mathematics research community is gearing up to do the work traditionally organized by a publisher.

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image: Renowned Retraction

Renowned Retraction

By | January 16, 2013

Authors retract a decade-old, highly-cited cancer study, admitting sloppy mistakes in the data analysis.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Publish Negative Results

Opinion: Publish Negative Results

By , and | January 15, 2013

Non-confirmatory or “negative” results are not worthless.

7 Comments

image: Expensive Retraction

Expensive Retraction

By | January 2, 2013

A publisher bills authors $650 to retract a twice-published paper.

2 Comments

image: Elsevier Hacked, Papers Retracted

Elsevier Hacked, Papers Retracted

By | December 12, 2012

Fake peer reviews were submitted to Elsevier due to a glitch in the publisher's security system, resulting in the retraction of 11 papers.

1 Comment

image: NIH To Enforce OA Policy

NIH To Enforce OA Policy

By | November 20, 2012

The National Institutes of Health will get tough on grantees who fail to comply with its open-access funding rule.

0 Comments

image: Do Innocent Errors Cause Most Retractions?

Do Innocent Errors Cause Most Retractions?

By | November 2, 2012

Contrary to previous studies, a new publication finds that most retractions from scholarly literature are not due to misconduct.  

3 Comments

image: Retraction Backlash

Retraction Backlash

By | November 1, 2012

Retracting a paper from the scientific literature can lead to fewer citations for related studies.  

0 Comments

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