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Transparency Now

By | May 1, 2016

Science is messy. So lay it out, warts and all.

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Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2016

May 2016's selection of notable quotes

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The Zombie Literature

By | May 1, 2016

Retractions are on the rise. But reams of flawed research papers persist in the scientific literature. Is it time to change the way papers are published?

9 Comments

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Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2016

April 2016's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: TS Picks: March 15, 2016

TS Picks: March 15, 2016

By | March 15, 2016

Profile of a CRISPR pioneer; SciHub, open access, and for-profit publishing; improving ecological models

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image: Paper Containing Creationist Language Pulled

Paper Containing Creationist Language Pulled

By | March 7, 2016

PLOS ONE says a breakdown in the peer-review process led to the publication of a now-retracted biomechanics paper that made reference to a “Creator.”

2 Comments

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Future Fields of Inquiry

By | March 7, 2016

Researchers propose an approach to identify new multidisciplinary interests in the sciences.

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Zika Update

By | February 16, 2016

Uptick in Guillain-Barré syndrome; Zika data-sharing snags; Brazilian state discontinues larvicide

1 Comment

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: PubPeer Users Question a Cancer Paper

PubPeer Users Question a Cancer Paper

By | January 13, 2016

A 2012 Cancer Cell paper is under investigation after users of the post-publication peer review website raised questions about the validity of Western blot images.

0 Comments

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