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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | October 1, 2015

October 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: TS Picks: September 29, 2015

TS Picks: September 29, 2015

By | September 29, 2015

Detailing publication contributions; mining human connectomes; all about mutations

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image: Data “Overflow” Compromising Science?

Data “Overflow” Compromising Science?

By | September 25, 2015

According to a new study, the deluge of scientific literature is leaving researchers unsure of which information to trust.

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image: “WikiGate” Ruffles OA Feathers

“WikiGate” Ruffles OA Feathers

By | September 16, 2015

A partnership between Wikipedia and scholarly publishing behemoth Elsevier has open-access advocates up in arms.

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image: Opinion: Pay-to-Play Publishing

Opinion: Pay-to-Play Publishing

By | September 3, 2015

Online scientific journals are sacrificing the quality of research articles to make a buck.

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image: New Journal Opens Research Process

New Journal Opens Research Process

By | September 3, 2015

An open-access journal that will publish research ideas, methods, workflows, and software has launched.

1 Comment

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2015

September 2015's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: PubPeer Founders Revealed

PubPeer Founders Revealed

By | August 31, 2015

Neuroscientist Brandon Stell identifies himself as one of the creators of the post-publication peer review website, as he and his colleagues announce the nonprofit PubPeer Foundation.

1 Comment

image: Psychology’s Failure to Replicate

Psychology’s Failure to Replicate

By | August 31, 2015

Researchers react to the finding that most of 100 studies recently analyzed were not reproducible.

2 Comments

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