The Scientist

» biomarkers and evolution

Most Recent

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2017 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Hitting It Out of the Park

Hitting It Out of the Park

By | April 1, 2017

Cancer can be as evasive and slippery as a spitball, but new immunotherapies are starting to connect.

0 Comments

Measuring PD-L1 levels was a great start. Now we need to quantify more protein biomarkers, assess the tumor mutational landscape, and examine immune cell signatures, too.

0 Comments

image: Study: Diet Contributes to Brain Size

Study: Diet Contributes to Brain Size

By | March 30, 2017

The results of a historical primate behavior analysis suggest that species with fruit-filled diets evolved larger brains.

1 Comment

image: Dinosaur Phylogenetic Tree Shake-Up

Dinosaur Phylogenetic Tree Shake-Up

By | March 24, 2017

An analysis of 74 dinosaur species leads a group of researchers to reorganize the extinct animals’ evolutionary history.

0 Comments

image: Sharks May Have Evolved from Acanthodians

Sharks May Have Evolved from Acanthodians

By | March 14, 2017

Analysis of an ancient shark fossil provides the strongest evidence to date that modern sharks derive from a class of 400 million–year-old bony fish.

0 Comments

“Buena vista” hypothesis suggests that changes in the sizes of eyes, rather than a shift from fins to limbs, led fish to transition to land more than 300 million years ago.  

1 Comment

image: Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

By | March 1, 2017

Researchers are using multiple methods to study the origins of humans’ capacity to process and produce music, and there’s no shortage of debate about the results.

0 Comments

image: Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

By | February 17, 2017

A computer algorithm can identify the brains of autism patients with moderate accuracy based on scans taken at six months and one year of age.

0 Comments

image: Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

By | February 15, 2017

Researchers have described a pregnant Dinochephalosaurus, and the fossilized remains suggest that the massive animal did not lay eggs, as previously suspected.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Grass Routes
    Features Grass Routes

    Researchers are discovering a suite of new locations and functions of endocannabinoid receptors that play roles in sickness and in health.

  3. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  4. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
AAAS