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image: New Method Can Sense Babies’ Pain

New Method Can Sense Babies’ Pain

By | May 5, 2017

By measuring brain activity patterns, scientists can more objectively assess infant distress.

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By examining brainwave patterns in a posterior cortical area, scientists can predict when people are dreaming.

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image: Thoughts Derailed

Thoughts Derailed

By | April 18, 2016

The same brain mechanism by which surprising events interrupt movements may also be involved in disrupting cognition, according to a study.

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image: Inside a Painter’s Brain

Inside a Painter’s Brain

By | October 24, 2014

Dean Cercone shares the cortical correlates of his creative process as part of a neuroscience-inspired exhibition.

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image: Ballroom Brainwaves

Ballroom Brainwaves

By | March 28, 2014

A neuroscientist studies the brains of tango dancers in an attempt to understand interpersonal connectedness.

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image: Disorder No More

Disorder No More

By | December 1, 2013

Researchers hunt for biomarkers of Asperger's syndrome, a condition that officially no longer exists.

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image: Traces of Life

Traces of Life

By | September 24, 2013

Researchers identify previously unrecognized neuronal activity in comatose human and feline brains.

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image: Predicting Autism’s Path

Predicting Autism’s Path

By | May 31, 2013

How brains of toddlers with autism respond to language is associated with later cognitive abilities.

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image: A Common Path to Unconsciousness

A Common Path to Unconsciousness

By | May 22, 2013

Analyses of brain activity patterns show that different drugs induce anesthesia via a common neural mechanism.

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image: Visual Consciousness Emerges

Visual Consciousness Emerges

By | April 22, 2013

A new study of brain activity patterns suggests that babies as young as 5 months old have the neural mechanisms to register that they’ve seen a face.  

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