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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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image: How Dopamine Tunes Working Memory

How Dopamine Tunes Working Memory

By | June 3, 2016

Dopamine receptors in the cortex orient the brain toward the task at hand.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Enhancing Vaccine Development

Enhancing Vaccine Development

By | June 1, 2016

Using proteomics methods to inform antigen selection

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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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Member, Department of Immunology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Age: 43

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image: Toward Targeted Therapies for Autoimmune Disorders

Toward Targeted Therapies for Autoimmune Disorders

By | June 1, 2016

Training the immune system to cease fire on native tissues could improve outcomes for autoimmune patients, but clinical progress has been slow.

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image: Pioneering Memory Researcher Dies

Pioneering Memory Researcher Dies

By | May 31, 2016

Suzanne Corkin, who studied the famous patient “H.M.,” has passed away at 79.

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: FDA Approves Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy

FDA Approves Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy

By | May 23, 2016

The US Food and Drug Administration greenlights Roche’s Tecentriq, which blocks a protein that obstructs the immune system’s ability to fight cancer.

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