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» memory and developmental biology

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image: How Dopamine Tunes Working Memory

How Dopamine Tunes Working Memory

By | June 3, 2016

Dopamine receptors in the cortex orient the brain toward the task at hand.


image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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image: Pioneering Memory Researcher Dies

Pioneering Memory Researcher Dies

By | May 31, 2016

Suzanne Corkin, who studied the famous patient “H.M.,” has passed away at 79.


image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.


image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks. 

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.


image: Prions in Plants?

Prions in Plants?

By | April 26, 2016

A plant protein that behaves like a prion when inserted into yeast could enable a form of botanical memory, a study suggests.


image: Thoughts Derailed

Thoughts Derailed

By | April 18, 2016

The same brain mechanism by which surprising events interrupt movements may also be involved in disrupting cognition, according to a study.


image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.


image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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