The Scientist

» memory and developmental biology

Most Recent

Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Memory Maker

Image of the Day: Memory Maker

By | June 2, 2017

The enzyme acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 turns on memory-building genes within the nuclei of hippocampal neurons. 

0 Comments

image: Long-Term Memory Storage Begins Immediately

Long-Term Memory Storage Begins Immediately

By | June 1, 2017

In mice, cells in the prefrontal cortex—where memories are maintained long-term—start to encode a fearful experience right from the start.

1 Comment

image: Image of the Day: Missing Pieces

Image of the Day: Missing Pieces

By | May 12, 2017

Researchers made a 3-D reconstruction of one of neurobiology's most famous brains—that of Henry Gustav Molaison (HM).

0 Comments

The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

3 Comments

Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

0 Comments

The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. GM Mosquitoes Closer to Release in U.S.
  2. German Scientists Resign from Elsevier Journals’ Editorial Boards
  3. Symmetrical Eyes Indicate Dyslexia
  4. Judge Recommends Ruling to Block Internet Access to Sci-Hub
RayBiotech