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image: Time, Flies

Time, Flies

By | November 1, 2016

By studying the sleep-wake cycle of fruit flies, Amita Sehgal is revealing how the body’s circadian and sleep rhythms are regulated.

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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

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image: Minding the Pulse of Memory Consolidation

Minding the Pulse of Memory Consolidation

By | July 28, 2016

Studying sleep spindles could help neuroscientists better understand certain cognitive impairments.  

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image: Neurons Compete to Form Memories

Neurons Compete to Form Memories

By | July 21, 2016

The same populations of brain cells encode memories that occur close together in time, according to new research.

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image: How Type 2 Diabetes Affects the Brain

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects the Brain

By | July 21, 2016

The results of studies on humans and zebrafish suggest how hyperglycemia can cause cognitive deficits.

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image: Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory

Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory

By | June 23, 2016

Running releases an enzyme that is associated with memory function in mice and humans.  

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image: Examining Sleep’s Roles in Memory and Learning

Examining Sleep’s Roles in Memory and Learning

By | June 13, 2016

Autonomic nervous system activity during sleep may help explain variation in the extent to which the behavior aids memory consolidation, a study shows.

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