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» memory and developmental biology

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

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image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Forgetful Bees Try New Flowers

Forgetful Bees Try New Flowers

By | March 1, 2015

Researchers demonstrate false memories in bumblebees.

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image: Notable Young Neuroscientist Dies

Notable Young Neuroscientist Dies

By | February 18, 2015

Xu Liu, who used optogenetics to manipulate memories in mice, has passed away at age 37.

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image: Mauro Costa-Mattioli: Memory’s Puppeteer

Mauro Costa-Mattioli: Memory’s Puppeteer

By | February 1, 2015

Associate Professor, Department of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine. Age: 39

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

8 Comments

image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Flavanols Could Mend Powers of Memory

Flavanols Could Mend Powers of Memory

By | October 27, 2014

In a small study, 50-to-69-year-olds performed better on a pattern recognition test after drinking antioxidants found in cocoa.

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