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image: Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

By | May 5, 2016

Maternal antibodies engender a receptive gut environment for beneficial bacteria in newborn mice.

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image: Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

By | May 4, 2016

Contrary to the popular thought that many species are “unculturable,” the majority of bacteria known to populate the human gut can be grown in the lab, scientists show.

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image: Earth: Home to 1 Trillion Microbial Species

Earth: Home to 1 Trillion Microbial Species

By | May 4, 2016

A new analysis of microbial data estimates that the world is home to 1 trillion species—of which only 0.001 percent have been discovered.

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image: Cell Reprogramming Successes

Cell Reprogramming Successes

By | May 2, 2016

Two studies demonstrate the first direct, chemical reprogramming of mouse and human skin cells into heart muscle and neural cells.

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image: Becoming Acculturated

Becoming Acculturated

By | May 1, 2016

Techniques for deep dives into the microbial dark matter

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image: More Than Skin Deep

More Than Skin Deep

By | May 1, 2016

Elaine Fuchs has worked on adult stem cells since before they were so named, figuring out how multipotent epidermal cells renew or turn into skin or hair follicles.

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image: Skin Cells Turned Into Immature Sperm

Skin Cells Turned Into Immature Sperm

By | April 29, 2016

The reprogrammed germ-like cells were unable to fertilize eggs, however. 

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image: Microbial Ice-Makers

Microbial Ice-Makers

By | April 26, 2016

How one bacterium turns water into ice at nonfreezing temperatures

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image: Stem Cells for Personalized Pain Therapy Testing

Stem Cells for Personalized Pain Therapy Testing

By | April 21, 2016

Using patient-derived stem cells, researchers create laboratory neuron models that reflect a patient’s response to a pain drug.

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image: Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

By | April 21, 2016

Housing laboratory mice with those reared in a pet store makes the lab rodents’ immune systems more similar to those of people.

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