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image: STAP Drama Continues

STAP Drama Continues

By | March 24, 2014

Nearly two months after researchers published papers showing that they could induce pluripotency with an external stressor, the work’s validity is still being challenged.


image: Week in Review: March 17–21

Week in Review: March 17–21

By | March 21, 2014

Protein appears to protect stressed neurons; vitamin A’s lifelong effects on immunity; stem cells influenced by substrates; supercharged photosynthesis through nanotechnology


image: Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

By | March 19, 2014

Commensal bacteria that populate the human gastrointestinal tract help digest dark chocolate, releasing anti-inflammatory compounds, researchers report.

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image: First STAP Report Released

First STAP Report Released

By | March 17, 2014

Questions of whether the stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency papers will be retracted linger as RIKEN makes public its initial investigation, finding no evidence of scientific misconduct.

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image: Stem Cells Remember Substrates

Stem Cells Remember Substrates

By | March 16, 2014

The stiffness of a culture substrate affects the fates of stem cells.  


image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | March 12, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research


image: Call for STAP Retractions

Call for STAP Retractions

By | March 11, 2014

One of the scientists behind the stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency studies, which independent groups have had trouble reproducing, has requested that the papers be pulled from the literature.

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image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes


image: Convergent Fish Fins

Convergent Fish Fins

By | March 5, 2014

Adipose fins, long considered vestigial, may have evolved multiple times as a key adaptation in some fish, study finds.

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image: Flashy Deep Sea Fish

Flashy Deep Sea Fish

By | March 5, 2014

Fish with complex light-emitting photophore patterns may be primed to split into new species.


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