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image: Dodgy Data Underpin Stem Cell Trial

Dodgy Data Underpin Stem Cell Trial

By | July 3, 2013

The patent application behind a controversial Italian treatment for neurodegenerative disease may contain duplicated images.

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image: “Bigfoot” Samples Yield Opossum DNA

“Bigfoot” Samples Yield Opossum DNA

By | July 2, 2013

Supposed Sasquatch samples turn out to be a mix of opossum and other known species, according to a new analysis.

4 Comments

image: Foot Fungus Revealed

Foot Fungus Revealed

By | July 2, 2013

A new study profiles the garden of fungal organism that grows on human feet.

1 Comment

image: Cancer Whisperer

Cancer Whisperer

By | July 1, 2013

Profile subject Cédric Blanpain describes his work rooting out the role of stem cells in tumors.

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image: Master of Fate

Master of Fate

By | July 1, 2013

While tracing the tricky and sometimes surprising paths of multipotent cells in the skin, mammary gland, and heart, Cédric Blanpain has repeatedly turned the stem cell field on its head.  

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image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

image: Fungus-Fighting Genes

Fungus-Fighting Genes

By | June 27, 2013

Two genes from wild relatives of wheat could save domestic wheat from fungal destruction.

1 Comment

image: Image of the Day: <em>E. coli</em> Hunter

Image of the Day: E. coli Hunter

By | June 27, 2013

The Shiga toxin may help E. coli survive predation by the protist Tetrahymena.

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image: Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

By | June 26, 2013

By sequencing the genome of a 700,000-year-old horse, researchers have pushed back the time of DNA survival by almost an order of magnitude.

3 Comments

image: Bacterial DNA in Human Genomes

Bacterial DNA in Human Genomes

By | June 20, 2013

A new study finds strong evidence that bacteria can transfer genes into human genomes, especially in cancer cells.

6 Comments

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