The Scientist

» stem cells and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

By | May 4, 2016

Contrary to the popular thought that many species are “unculturable,” the majority of bacteria known to populate the human gut can be grown in the lab, scientists show.

0 Comments

image: Earth: Home to 1 Trillion Microbial Species

Earth: Home to 1 Trillion Microbial Species

By | May 4, 2016

A new analysis of microbial data estimates that the world is home to 1 trillion species—of which only 0.001 percent have been discovered.

0 Comments

image: Cell Reprogramming Successes

Cell Reprogramming Successes

By | May 2, 2016

Two studies demonstrate the first direct, chemical reprogramming of mouse and human skin cells into heart muscle and neural cells.

0 Comments

image: Becoming Acculturated

Becoming Acculturated

By | May 1, 2016

Techniques for deep dives into the microbial dark matter

0 Comments

image: More Than Skin Deep

More Than Skin Deep

By | May 1, 2016

Elaine Fuchs has worked on adult stem cells since before they were so named, figuring out how multipotent epidermal cells renew or turn into skin or hair follicles.

1 Comment

image: Skin Cells Turned Into Immature Sperm

Skin Cells Turned Into Immature Sperm

By | April 29, 2016

The reprogrammed germ-like cells were unable to fertilize eggs, however. 

0 Comments

image: Microbial Ice-Makers

Microbial Ice-Makers

By | April 26, 2016

How one bacterium turns water into ice at nonfreezing temperatures

4 Comments

image: Stem Cells for Personalized Pain Therapy Testing

Stem Cells for Personalized Pain Therapy Testing

By | April 21, 2016

Using patient-derived stem cells, researchers create laboratory neuron models that reflect a patient’s response to a pain drug.

0 Comments

image: Monitoring Mitochondrial Mutations

Monitoring Mitochondrial Mutations

By | April 18, 2016

Induced pluripotent stem cells—particularly those generated from older patients—should be screened for defects in mitochondrial DNA, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 11, 2016

Researchers create a new tree of life, largely composed of mystery bacteria.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Immune Cells Deliver Cancer Drugs to the Brain
AAAS