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image: Heart Strings

Heart Strings

By | May 1, 2015

An animated primer on the harvesting, growth, and administration of cardiac cells to heart attack patients

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image: Scanning for SIV’s Sanctuaries

Scanning for SIV’s Sanctuaries

By | May 1, 2015

Whole-body immunoPET scans of SIV-infected macaques reveal where the replicating virus hides.  

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image: Show Me Your Moves

Show Me Your Moves

By | May 1, 2015

Updated classics and new techniques help microbiologists get up close and quantitative.

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image: The Origins of O

The Origins of O

By | May 1, 2015

A strain of HIV that has afflicted more than 100,000 people emerged from gorillas.

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image: Hearts on Trial

Hearts on Trial

By | May 1, 2015

As researchers conduct the most rigorous human trials of cardiac cell therapies yet attempted, a clear picture of whether these treatments actually work is imminent.

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image: Targeted Information in the Rat Brain

Targeted Information in the Rat Brain

By | April 30, 2015

A study shows that the hippocampus selects which information to send, and where, during different behaviors.

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image: Bacterial Taxis Deliver Proteins

Bacterial Taxis Deliver Proteins

By | April 28, 2015

Reengineered protein-shuttling machinery can be used to inject a particular protein into mammalian cells, according to a proof-of-principle study.

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image: One-Man Tinnitus Map

One-Man Tinnitus Map

By | April 26, 2015

Researchers probe the neural roots of the ear-ringing condition in a man undergoing brain surgery.

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image: How a Popular Probiotic Works

How a Popular Probiotic Works

By | April 16, 2015

Eating a type of bacterium encourages the activity of other gut microbes, according to a small study.

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image: Why DBS Works for Parkinson’s?

Why DBS Works for Parkinson’s?

By | April 14, 2015

Deep-brain stimulation may effectively treat slow movement, tremor, and rigidity in Parkinson’s patients by reducing synchronicity of neural activity in the motor cortex.

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