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image: Crossed Wires

Crossed Wires

By | January 16, 2015

From similar sets of neuroimaging data, researchers are reaching different conclusions about whether brain wiring differs between men and women.

7 Comments

image: Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

By | January 1, 2015

An analysis of 31 tissues finds that random mutations acquired during stem cell divisions correlate with lifetime cancer risk.  

7 Comments

image: Eye on the Fly

Eye on the Fly

By | January 1, 2015

Automating Drosophila behavior screens gives researchers a break from tedious observation, and enables higher-throughput, more-quantitative experiments than ever before.

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image: Micro Masterpiece

Micro Masterpiece

By | January 1, 2015

The artful science of Tom Deerinck, a micrographer who consistently places in Nikon’s Small World competition

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image: Picturing Infection

Picturing Infection

By | January 1, 2015

Whole-animal, light-based imaging of infected small mammals

4 Comments

image: Rat Race

Rat Race

By | January 1, 2015

Neuroscientist Anthony Zador explains why he uses rats to understand auditory attention in the brain.

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image: Tangle Trigger

Tangle Trigger

By | January 1, 2015

An enzyme that cleaves tau protein in acidic cellular conditions may trigger early events in Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: Toward Lab-Grown Gametes

Toward Lab-Grown Gametes

By | December 30, 2014

From stem cells, scientists generate early egg- and sperm-like cells in vitro.

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image: Contaminants Could’ve Accounted for STAP

Contaminants Could’ve Accounted for STAP

By | December 29, 2014

Embryonic stem cells likely mucked up the cultures used in the debunked “stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency” studies.

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image: Science Setbacks: 2014

Science Setbacks: 2014

By | December 25, 2014

This year in life science was marked by paltry federal funding increases, revelations of sequence contamination, and onerous regulations.

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