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image: How We Age

How We Age

By | March 1, 2015

From DNA damage to cellular miscommunication, aging is a mysterious and multifarious process.

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image: Stem Cells Phone Home

Stem Cells Phone Home

By | February 26, 2015

A screen of 9,000 small molecules identifies a treatment that improves the targeting of mesenchymal stem cells to sites of damaged tissue.

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image: Stemming Genetic Changes in Cultured Cells

Stemming Genetic Changes in Cultured Cells

By | February 25, 2015

Researchers report an association between culture conditions and genetic changes in stem cells over time.

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image: Fighting Allergy with Allergen

Fighting Allergy with Allergen

By | February 25, 2015

Babies who ate peanuts were less likely to develop an allergy to the food by the time they hit kindergarten, according to a new study.

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image: Exploring the Epigenome

Exploring the Epigenome

By | February 18, 2015

A National Institutes of Health-funded consortium publishes 111 reference maps of DNA and histone marks.

2 Comments

image: Neuroscience of Marijuana Munchies

Neuroscience of Marijuana Munchies

By | February 18, 2015

Cannabinoids cause appetite-suppressing neurons to produce an appetite-stimulating hormone in mice.

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image: “Inner GPS” Support

“Inner GPS” Support

By | February 5, 2015

Grid cells—the neurons that function as a spatial navigation system—require input from another set of neurons, a rat study shows.

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image: Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

By | February 4, 2015

Genetically modified T memory stem cells persist in patients for more than 10 years, and can differentiate into a variety of T cell types.

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image: B Cell Bosses

B Cell Bosses

By | February 1, 2015

Gut bacteria in mice spur regulatory B cells to differentiate and release an anti-inflammatory cytokine.

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image: Bouncing Back

Bouncing Back

By | February 1, 2015

In mice, a transcriptional regulator, β-catenin, activates a microRNA-processing pathway in the nucleus accumbens to promote resilience to social stress.

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