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Eye on the Fly

By | January 1, 2015

Automating Drosophila behavior screens gives researchers a break from tedious observation, and enables higher-throughput, more-quantitative experiments than ever before.

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Innovation Renovation

By | January 1, 2015

Is the fear of funding and doing fundamental, risky research killing our ability to make breakthroughs?

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Micro Masterpiece

By | January 1, 2015

The artful science of Tom Deerinck, a micrographer who consistently places in Nikon’s Small World competition

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Rat Race

By | January 1, 2015

Neuroscientist Anthony Zador explains why he uses rats to understand auditory attention in the brain.

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Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2015

January 2015's selection of notable quotes

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Tangle Trigger

By | January 1, 2015

An enzyme that cleaves tau protein in acidic cellular conditions may trigger early events in Alzheimer’s disease.

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Toward Lab-Grown Gametes

By | December 30, 2014

From stem cells, scientists generate early egg- and sperm-like cells in vitro.

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Contaminants Could’ve Accounted for STAP

By | December 29, 2014

Embryonic stem cells likely mucked up the cultures used in the debunked “stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency” studies.

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Science Setbacks: 2014

By | December 25, 2014

This year in life science was marked by paltry federal funding increases, revelations of sequence contamination, and onerous regulations.

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image: 2014’s Most “Liked” Images of the Day

2014’s Most “Liked” Images of the Day

By | December 24, 2014

The best of The Scientist’s popular daily image posts

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