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image: Do Brighter Species’ Brains Emit Redder Light?

Do Brighter Species’ Brains Emit Redder Light?

By | October 1, 2016

Photon emissions in the brain are red-shifted in more-intelligent species, though scientists dispute what that means.

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image: New and Old Techniques in Modern Neuroscience

New and Old Techniques in Modern Neuroscience

By | October 1, 2016

Imaging and manipulating the brain has come a long way from electrodes and the patch clamp, though such traditional tools remain essential.

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image: Stem Cells Made Waves in Biology and Medicine

Stem Cells Made Waves in Biology and Medicine

By | October 1, 2016

Since their introduction to the lab, pluripotent stem cells have gone from research tool to therapeutic, but the journey has been rocky.

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image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

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image: Circadian-Controlled Thirst

Circadian-Controlled Thirst

By | September 28, 2016

Scientists determine how the brain’s central clock regulates drinking prior to sleep in rodents.

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image: Facebook CEO’s Donation a Boon to Basic Science

Facebook CEO’s Donation a Boon to Basic Science

By | September 25, 2016

But can $3 billion dollars meet the lofty goals of the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative?

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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Matching the immunological characteristics of donor retinal cells to those of the recipient can reduce the chance of rejection.

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Researchers short circuit the urge to consume alcohol in rat models of compulsive drinking by shutting down specific neurons wired to the brain’s reward system.

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