The Scientist

» stem cells, neuroscience and evolution

Most Recent

image: Blood Stem Cells Grown in the Lab

Blood Stem Cells Grown in the Lab

By | May 17, 2017

Researchers identify transcription factors and environmental conditions necessary to reprogram human and mouse cells into cells that function like hematopoietic stem cells.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Missing Pieces

Image of the Day: Missing Pieces

By | May 12, 2017

Researchers made a 3-D reconstruction of one of neurobiology's most famous brains—that of Henry Gustav Molaison (HM).

0 Comments

New research provides evidence that the ancient hominin species might not be so ancient after all.

0 Comments

image: Synthetic Bones: A Better Bone-Marrow Transplant?

Synthetic Bones: A Better Bone-Marrow Transplant?

By | May 9, 2017

Artificial bones produce new blood cells in mice, obviating the need for irradiation to kill off resident hematopoietic stem cells in recipients.

0 Comments

The infamous "Baby Louie" embryo is a giant oviraptorosaur fossil from China that resembled a gargantuan bird.

0 Comments

image: Stem Cell Trial Data Mostly Go Unpublished

Stem Cell Trial Data Mostly Go Unpublished

By | May 5, 2017

Less than half of completed stem cell studies in humans are published in peer-reviewed journals, according to an analysis of regenerative medicine trials. 

1 Comment

image: Computers That Can Smell

Computers That Can Smell

By | May 1, 2017

Teams of modelers compete to develop algorithms for estimating how people will perceive a particular odor from its molecular characteristics.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | May 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2017 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

3 Comments

image: Glia Guru

Glia Guru

By | May 1, 2017

Ben Barres recast glial cells from supporting actors to star performers, crucial for synaptic plasticity in the brain and for preventing neurodegenerative disorders.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

  3. Government Nixes Teaching Evolution in Turkish Schools
  4. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
AAAS