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image: CIRM Ups Translational Velocity

CIRM Ups Translational Velocity

By | December 21, 2015

California’s stem cell agency unveiled a 5-year plan that includes starting 50 new clinical trials.

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image: Algal Toxin Hurts Sea Lion Memory

Algal Toxin Hurts Sea Lion Memory

By | December 16, 2015

Results could explain why the marine mammals have been stranding on the West coast in record numbers.

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image: “Ghost Fibers” Help Heal Muscle Injury

“Ghost Fibers” Help Heal Muscle Injury

By | December 15, 2015

Injured muscle cells leave behind organized collagen fibers that act as scaffolding for new tissue growth.

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image: Complications of Brain Manipulations

Complications of Brain Manipulations

By | December 9, 2015

The complex connectivities of mammalian and avian brains can confound the outcomes of transient neural manipulations, researchers show.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

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image: Family Ties

Family Ties

By | December 1, 2015

There’s more to inheritance than genes.

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image: The Regenerator

The Regenerator

By | December 1, 2015

In his search for effective therapies for Parkinson’s disease, Lorenz Studer is uncovering pluripotency switches and clues to what makes cells age.

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image: BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

By | November 30, 2015

The cancer-related protein BRCA1 is important for learning and memory in mice and is depleted in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, according to a study.

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image: Cortical Census

Cortical Census

By | November 26, 2015

Scientists document the characteristics and connections of mouse neocortical neurons to establish the most detailed microcircuit map to date.

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image: Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

By | November 24, 2015

Bacteria in the intestine produce proteins that stop rodents from eating.

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