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image: “Inner GPS” Support

“Inner GPS” Support

By | February 5, 2015

Grid cells—the neurons that function as a spatial navigation system—require input from another set of neurons, a rat study shows.

2 Comments

image: Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

By | February 4, 2015

Genetically modified T memory stem cells persist in patients for more than 10 years, and can differentiate into a variety of T cell types.

1 Comment

image: Bouncing Back

Bouncing Back

By | February 1, 2015

In mice, a transcriptional regulator, β-catenin, activates a microRNA-processing pathway in the nucleus accumbens to promote resilience to social stress.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2015

Touch, The Altruistic Brain, Is Shame Necessary?, and Future Arctic

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image: Brain Cells Behind Overeating

Brain Cells Behind Overeating

By | January 29, 2015

Scientists have defined mouse neurons responsible for excessive food consumption at an unprecedented level of detail. 

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image: Filming the Nematode Brain

Filming the Nematode Brain

By | January 26, 2015

Researchers record the first whole-brain videos of an unrestrained animal, viewing neural activity as a roundworm moved freely around a Petri dish.

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image: Oxytocin for Autism?

Oxytocin for Autism?

By | January 21, 2015

Scientists find that the hormone improves sociability in a mouse model of autism.

4 Comments

image: Pioneering Neuroscientist Dies

Pioneering Neuroscientist Dies

By | January 19, 2015

Vernon Mountcastle, who mapped the functional landscape of the neocortex, passed away at age 96.

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image: Crossed Wires

Crossed Wires

By | January 16, 2015

From similar sets of neuroimaging data, researchers are reaching different conclusions about whether brain wiring differs between men and women.

7 Comments

image: Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

By | January 1, 2015

An analysis of 31 tissues finds that random mutations acquired during stem cell divisions correlate with lifetime cancer risk—more so than heritable mutations and environmental factors combined.  

7 Comments

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