The Scientist

» stem cells, immunology and culture

Most Recent

image: A Good Night’s Sleep

A Good Night’s Sleep

By | September 1, 2012

Sleep-wake cycles affect how well our bodies fight disease.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2012

Wired for Story, Dreamland, Homo Mysterious, and Vagina

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2012

September 2012's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: A Story Biological

A Story Biological

By | September 1, 2012

Using scientific information as narrative can be a powerful way to communicate.

0 Comments

image: Gifted in Science

Gifted in Science

By | September 1, 2012

Researchers look to the emerging phenomenon of "crowdfunding" to pay for their work

1 Comment

image: Stemming the Toxic Tide

Stemming the Toxic Tide

By | September 1, 2012

How to screen for toxicity using stem cells

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Younger Is Better

Opinion: Younger Is Better

By | August 31, 2012

Stem cells collected from younger donors are more effective for transplantation and regenerative medicine than those from older individuals.

9 Comments

image: Glass Shape Speeds Drinking

Glass Shape Speeds Drinking

By | August 31, 2012

The shape of the glass holding your favorite brew can affect how quickly you get drunk.

31 Comments

image: Creating Sperm from Skin

Creating Sperm from Skin

By | August 30, 2012

Researchers create early stage sperm cells from induced pluripotent stem cells, raising hopes that infertile men could be fathers.

0 Comments

image: Stalking Sharks

Stalking Sharks

By | August 30, 2012

Researchers monitor the movement of the Pacific’s largest predators and share the information with the world in real time.

0 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Too Many Mitochondrial Genome Papers
  2. Antibiotics and the Gut Microbiome
  3. Sex Differences in Pain Pathway
  4. Anti-Vax Doctor Found Dead
    The Nutshell Anti-Vax Doctor Found Dead

    Police are calling the death of James Bradstreet, a physician who claimed vaccines cause autism and offered autism cures to patients, an apparent suicide.

Advertisement
BioLegend
BioLegend
Advertisement
The Scientist