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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.

6 Comments

image: Organs on Demand

Organs on Demand

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing has made inroads in the clinic, but constructing functional complex organs still faces major hurdles.

2 Comments

image: Week in Review: August 26–30

Week in Review: August 26–30

By | August 30, 2013

New model for neurodevelopment; more biotechs going public; how a virus jumped from mammals to birds; statin side effect linked to genetic variant

0 Comments

image: Lab-Grown Model Brains

Lab-Grown Model Brains

By | August 28, 2013

Three-dimensional tissues called “cerebral organoids” can model the earliest stages of brain development.

5 Comments

image: Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

By | August 15, 2013

Continuously eating fatty foods perturbs communication between the gut and brain, which in turn perpetuates a bad diet.

8 Comments

image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

17 Comments

image: Tumor-Targeting T Cells Engineered

Tumor-Targeting T Cells Engineered

By | August 11, 2013

Scientists genetically modify T cells derived from pluripotent stem cells to attack lymphatic tumors.

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image: Cancer-Causing Herbal Remedies

Cancer-Causing Herbal Remedies

By | August 7, 2013

A potent carcinogen lurks within certain traditional Chinese medicines.

15 Comments

image: Lab-Grown Burger Taste Test

Lab-Grown Burger Taste Test

By | August 6, 2013

The world’s first burger grown in a petri dish was cooked and served up in a public taste test.

8 Comments

image: STW: In the Field

STW: In the Field

By | August 1, 2013

Scientist to Watch Josh Snodgrass has traveled the world, from Siberia to South America, to study how the physiology of indigenous peoples shifts with changing lifestyles.

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