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image: Stem Cells Remember Substrates

Stem Cells Remember Substrates

By | March 16, 2014

The stiffness of a culture substrate affects the fates of stem cells.  

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image: Call for STAP Retractions

Call for STAP Retractions

By | March 11, 2014

One of the scientists behind the stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency studies, which independent groups have had trouble reproducing, has requested that the papers be pulled from the literature.

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image: Positive Developments on the HIV Front

Positive Developments on the HIV Front

By | March 7, 2014

A gene-editing protocol shows promise, and a second baby who was started on antiretroviral drugs soon after birth appears to be virus-free a year later.

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image: High Protein, High Risk?

High Protein, High Risk?

By | March 6, 2014

Low-protein diets are linked to longer life spans in mice and humans.

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image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Hwang Convictions Upheld

Hwang Convictions Upheld

By | February 28, 2014

Just two weeks after discredited stem cell scientist Woo Suk Hwang received a US patent for his fraudulent work, his luck runs short as his convictions of embezzlement and bioethics violations are upheld.

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image: Week in Review: February 24–28

Week in Review: February 24–28

By | February 28, 2014

New PLOS data sharing rules; mouse cortical connectome published; reprogramming astrocytes into neurons and fibroblasts into hepatocytes

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image: For Whom the Biomarkers Toll?

For Whom the Biomarkers Toll?

By | February 27, 2014

Study finds that a handful of biological indicators can predict a healthy person’s risk of dying within five years.

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image: MERS Common in Camels

MERS Common in Camels

By | February 25, 2014

Study suggests many camels in Saudi Arabia are infected with the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus at some point in their lives.

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