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image: Judges Side with FDA on Stem Cells

Judges Side with FDA on Stem Cells

By | February 6, 2014

A US federal appeals court maintains that stem cells proliferated in a lab must be regulated as a drug.

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image: $230M for Big Disease

$230M for Big Disease

By | February 5, 2014

The National Institutes of Health is partnering with 10 drug companies to find new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus.

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image: New Bird Flu Threat?

New Bird Flu Threat?

By | February 4, 2014

Chinese officials report the first two human cases of H10N8 avian influenza, one of which is linked to the death of a 73-year-old woman.

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image: Microbial Smog

Microbial Smog

By | February 3, 2014

Some 1,300 species of microbes, including some associated with allergies and lung disease, are adrift in Beijing’s thick smog.

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image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.

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image: An Offensive Playbook

An Offensive Playbook

By | February 1, 2014

Developing nonaddictive drugs to combat pain

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: On Race and Medicine

On Race and Medicine

By | February 1, 2014

Until health care becomes truly personalized, race and ethnicity will continue to be important clues guiding medical treatments.

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image: Pain and Progress

Pain and Progress

By | February 1, 2014

Is it possible to make a nonaddictive opioid painkiller?

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image: Syphilis: Then and Now

Syphilis: Then and Now

By , , and | February 1, 2014

Researchers are zeroing in on the origin of syphilis and related diseases, which continue to plague the human population some 500 years after the first documented case.

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