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image: Influential Ecologist Dies

Influential Ecologist Dies

By | September 24, 2013

Ruth Patrick, who pioneered freshwater pollution monitoring, has passed away at age 105.

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image: Week in Review: September 16–20

Week in Review: September 16–20

By | September 20, 2013

Dealing with anonymous misconduct allegations; efficiently generating iPSCs; distinguishing viral infections from non-viral; imaging tau in vivo

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image: Inducing Pluripotency Every Time

Inducing Pluripotency Every Time

By | September 18, 2013

By removing a single gene, adult cells can be reprogrammed into a stem-like state with nearly 100 percent efficiency.

3 Comments

image: Week in Review: September 9–13

Week in Review: September 9–13

By | September 13, 2013

A new type of stem cell; a parasitic ant species protects its hosts; reasons for biodiversity among tropical amphibians; transforming translational research

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image: Bird, Fish, and Fly Cells Reprogrammed

Bird, Fish, and Fly Cells Reprogrammed

By | September 5, 2013

Using mouse genes, researchers partially transform differentiated, non-mammalian cells into pluripotent stem cells.

3 Comments

image: Printing Ears

Printing Ears

By | September 1, 2013

Cornell University biomedical engineer Lawrence Bonassar 3-D prints ears using “ink” that contains living cells.

2 Comments

image: Printing Life

Printing Life

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing allows tissue engineers to fabricate more-complex shapes and to precisely mix biological materials.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2013

September 2013's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Making Meat

Making Meat

By | September 1, 2013

This animation explains the process researchers used to make a lab-grown hamburger patty, which was served up for the first time in early August, 2013.

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image: Organs on Demand

Organs on Demand

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing has made inroads in the clinic, but constructing functional complex organs still faces major hurdles.

2 Comments

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