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image: Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

By | September 6, 2017

Sweet taste receptor-activating molecules produced by sinus microbes suppress the local innate immune system in humans.

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image: Fingerprints of Ongoing Human Evolution Found

Fingerprints of Ongoing Human Evolution Found

By | September 5, 2017

Genetic variants in Alzheimer’s- and smoking-related genes appear to be under selection pressure, according to a study comparing the genomes of old and young participants.

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image: An Immunological Timeline for Pregnancy

An Immunological Timeline for Pregnancy

By | September 1, 2017

A new study uses blood samples from pregnant women to track changes in the immune system leading up to birth, and predicts gestational age from the mothers’ immune signatures.

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image: How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

By | September 1, 2017

A study traces proteins’ evolution from the immune to the olfactory system.

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image: Ready, Set, Grow

Ready, Set, Grow

By | September 1, 2017

How to culture stem cells without depending on mouse feeder cells

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image: Researchers Identify Clue to Asymmetric Cell Division

Researchers Identify Clue to Asymmetric Cell Division

By | September 1, 2017

Phosphorylation of a surface protein on endosomes is key to the organelles’ uneven distribution in daughter cells.

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image: Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?

Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?

By | September 1, 2017

The once fringe idea is gaining traction among the scientific community.

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Emerging evidence links bacterial or viral infection with the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: Infographic: Why Not All Cell Divisions Are Equal

Infographic: Why Not All Cell Divisions Are Equal

By | September 1, 2017

Phosphorylation of a protein called Sara found on the surface of endosomes appears to be a key regulator of asymmetric splitting in fruit flies.

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image: FDA Goes After Two Stem Cell Clinics

FDA Goes After Two Stem Cell Clinics

By | August 29, 2017

The agency raided one that was using a stem cell-smallpox vaccine combo, and sent a warning to another to obey best practices.

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