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image: Snake Imitators Persist

Snake Imitators Persist

By | June 12, 2014

A harmless snake in the Carolina Sandhills has been mimicking a poisonous species for decades, and has become a better imitator since the latter went extinct.

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image: Light-Sensing Retina in a Dish

Light-Sensing Retina in a Dish

By | June 10, 2014

From human induced pluripotent stem cells, researchers grow 3-D retinal tissue that can sense light. 

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image: Faces for Fighting?

Faces for Fighting?

By | June 10, 2014

Scientists propose that hominin facial bones evolved for protection against the powerful blows of combat.

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image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

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image: Week in Review: June 2–6

Week in Review: June 2–6

By | June 6, 2014

The malnourished microbiome; innate immunity and beige fat; tools for stem cell self-renewal; predicting tomorrow’s PIs; MERS update

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image: Minimal Toolkit for Stem Cell Self-Renewal

Minimal Toolkit for Stem Cell Self-Renewal

By | June 5, 2014

Researchers identify a network of a dozen transcription factors needed to maintain the pluripotent state of mouse embryonic stem cells. 

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image: Final Straw for STAP?

Final Straw for STAP?

By | June 4, 2014

Independent analysis uncovers suspected mouse cell mix-up, while stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency lead author Haruko Obokata agrees to retract the work in full.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Drunken Monkey</em>

Book Excerpt from The Drunken Monkey

By | June 1, 2014

In Chapter 3, "On the Inebriation of Elephants," author Robert Dudley considers whether tales of tipsy pachyderms and bombed baboons have any basis in scientific truth.

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image: Drunks and Monkeys

Drunks and Monkeys

By | June 1, 2014

Understanding our primate ancestors’ relationship with alcohol can inform its use by modern humans.  

5 Comments

image: For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival

For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival

By | May 29, 2014

Two island populations of male crickets independently evolved to evade parasites by keeping quiet, and have come up with a way to sneak matings with females that still seek the male courtship song.

2 Comments

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