The Scientist

» stem cells, immunology and genetics & genomics

Most Recent

image: Denisovan DNA Reveals Human Roots

Denisovan DNA Reveals Human Roots

By | November 19, 2015

The ancient genomes of 50,000-year-old Denisovan teeth suggest the extinct species lived alongside Neanderthals and modern humans.


image: Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

By | November 18, 2015

Two sequencing studies reveal the genetics underlying the sexual behavior of the European and Asian birds.


image: Birth of the Skin Microbiome

Birth of the Skin Microbiome

By | November 17, 2015

The immune system tolerates the colonization of commensal bacteria on the skin with the aid of regulatory T cells during the first few weeks of life, a mouse study shows.


image: Incan Mummy Genome Sequenced

Incan Mummy Genome Sequenced

By | November 16, 2015

Researchers decode mitochondrial DNA from the 500-year-old remains of a native South American child, revealing a new line of maternal ancestors.


image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.


image: Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

By | November 5, 2015

Gut microbiome composition can influence the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy in mice.

1 Comment

image: Three Origins for Rice?

Three Origins for Rice?

By | November 3, 2015

Rice was domesticated three separate times across Asia, a new study suggests.


image: Ebola’s Immune Escape

Ebola’s Immune Escape

By | November 3, 2015

The virus can persist in several tissues where the immune system is less active. Researchers are working to better understand this phenomenon and how it can stall the clearing of Ebola in survivors.

1 Comment

image: Allele Linked to Obesity in People

Allele Linked to Obesity in People

By | November 3, 2015

A single nucleotide polymorphism in BDNF is tied with lower levels of the protein and higher body-mass index.


image: Fanning the Flames

Fanning the Flames

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity triggers a fatty acid synthesis pathway, which in turn helps drive T cell differentiation and inflammation.


Celsee Diagnostics
Celsee Diagnostics

Popular Now

  1. Antidepressant Exerts Epigenetic Changes
  2. The Unregulation of Biotech Crops
  3. Image of the Day: Mother’s Love
  4. Remote Mind Control
Life Technologies