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» stem cells and immunology

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image: iPSCs and Cancer Risk

iPSCs and Cancer Risk

By | February 24, 2016

Reprogramming adult human cells into stem cells in vitro does not generate harmful mutations, scientists report.

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image: Insulin-Producing Mini Stomachs

Insulin-Producing Mini Stomachs

By | February 22, 2016

Scientists grow gastric organs in vitro that can restore insulin production when transplanted into mice.

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image: Premature Assault?

Premature Assault?

By | February 9, 2016

Plants may trick bacteria into attacking before the microbial population reaches a critical size, allowing the plants to successfully defend the weak invasion.

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image: Stem Cells to Blame for Hair Loss?

Stem Cells to Blame for Hair Loss?

By | February 8, 2016

Two new studies point to factors in hair follicle stem cells as players in age-related hair loss.

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image: Organ Engineer Reinvestigated

Organ Engineer Reinvestigated

By | February 5, 2016

Paolo Macchiarini will again be investigated by the Karolinska Institute, which is not extending the researcher’s employment contract.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fungal Security Force

Fungal Security Force

By | February 1, 2016

In yew trees, Taxol-producing fungi function as an immune system to ward off pathogens.

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image: Holding Their Ground

Holding Their Ground

By | February 1, 2016

To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

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image: Plant Immunity

Plant Immunity

By | February 1, 2016

How plants fight off pathogens

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image: Infection-Autism Link Explained?

Infection-Autism Link Explained?

By | January 31, 2016

A mouse study suggests a mechanism by which severe infections during pregnancy increase autism risk. 

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