The Scientist

» stem cells and immunology

Most Recent

image: In the Long Run

In the Long Run

By | December 1, 2012

Can emulating our early human ancestors make us healthier?

1 Comment

image: Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

By | November 27, 2012

Autism researchers are testing the ability of whipworm eggs to treat autism in a new clinical trial.

10 Comments

image: BioTime Seeks Geron Stem Cell Assets

BioTime Seeks Geron Stem Cell Assets

By | November 13, 2012

Two former Geron CEOs make a bid for the company’s defunct human embryonic stem cell business.

1 Comment

image: Inflammation for Regeneration

Inflammation for Regeneration

By | November 8, 2012

Inflammatory signals in injured zebrafish brains promote the growth of new neurons.

1 Comment

image: Long and Rocky Roads

Long and Rocky Roads

By | November 1, 2012

From basic research to beneficial therapies

0 Comments

image: Bacterial Cocktail Treats Infection

Bacterial Cocktail Treats Infection

By | October 29, 2012

Mice fed a mix of six strains of bacteria were able to fight a C. difficile infection that causes deadly diarrhea and is resistant to most types of treatment.

2 Comments

image: Viruses Affect Cell Reprogramming

Viruses Affect Cell Reprogramming

By | October 25, 2012

Viral vectors used to carry transcription factors that de-differentiate cells into a stem-cell-like state are themselves a key factor in efficient reprogramming.

5 Comments

image: Ancient Viruses Wreak New Havoc

Ancient Viruses Wreak New Havoc

By | October 24, 2012

Viral DNA in mice genomes may lead to cancer in immune-compromised animals.

0 Comments

image: Discredited Stem Cell Researcher Fired

Discredited Stem Cell Researcher Fired

By | October 23, 2012

The researcher who falsely claimed to treat human patients with their own stem cells is dismissed, but insists that he did perform the procedure on one patient.

0 Comments

image: New Culprit for Parkinson’s?

New Culprit for Parkinson’s?

By | October 17, 2012

Scientists use human stem cells to show that nuclear defects may play a role in Parkinson’s disease, and suggest a way to reverse the problem.

4 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Advertisement
Life Technologies