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Matching the immunological characteristics of donor retinal cells to those of the recipient can reduce the chance of rejection.

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Tips on how to surmount the challenges of working with CRISPR to manipulate genes in human stems cells to study their function in specific diseases or to correct genetic defects in patient cells.

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image: What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

By | September 1, 2016

Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.

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image: One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

By | August 31, 2016

Host and bacterial ligands that interact with the same cell-surface receptor induce different activities in human macrophages. 

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image: One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

By | August 26, 2016

Precursor T cells bearing the same antigen receptor adopt two different fates in mice.

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image: Stem Cells Drive Cancer Risk in Mice

Stem Cells Drive Cancer Risk in Mice

By | August 26, 2016

Mutations that arise during stem cell division contribute to the development of cancers in a variety of organs, according to a study.

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image: Zika Infects Adult Neural Progenitors Too

Zika Infects Adult Neural Progenitors Too

By | August 18, 2016

A mouse study shows that the virus has tropism for adult proliferative neural progenitor cells and immature neurons.

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image: NIH Reveals Plan to Fund Human-Animal Chimeras

NIH Reveals Plan to Fund Human-Animal Chimeras

By | August 4, 2016

The public gets to weigh in before the US government lifts its ban on such research.

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image: Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

By | August 1, 2016

In mice, immune cells from the body cavity surrounding organs arrive at the site of damage to chew up the nuclei of dead cells.

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image: Nailing Down HAR Function

Nailing Down HAR Function

By | August 1, 2016

A remaining challenge in the study of human accelerated regions (HARs) is establishing their specific functions during development and other biological processes.

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