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image: Women Lose Vision After Stem Cell Treatment

Women Lose Vision After Stem Cell Treatment

By | March 17, 2017

The adipose-derived cells were injected into the patients’ eyes to treat age-related macular degeneration. 

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image: Singing Through Tone Deafness

Singing Through Tone Deafness

By | March 17, 2017

Author Tim Falconer didn't take his congenital amusia lying down. With the help of neuroscientists and vocal coaches, he tried to teach himself to sing against all odds.

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image: Suicide Switch for Transplanted Stem Cells

Suicide Switch for Transplanted Stem Cells

By | March 2, 2017

Researchers use an inducible gene to limit tumor growth from human iPSCs transplanted into mice.

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image: How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

By | March 1, 2017

One author's journey through the science of his congenital amusia

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image: Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

By | March 1, 2017

Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | March 1, 2017

Music, the future of American science, and more

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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: Image of the Day: Mammary Trees

Image of the Day: Mammary Trees

By | February 14, 2017

Long-lived stem cells are activated by ovarian hormones to help grow mammary glands during pregnancy.

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image: Regulators OK Clinical Trials Using Donor Stem Cells

Regulators OK Clinical Trials Using Donor Stem Cells

By | February 6, 2017

Japanese health officials approve human experiments to treat macular degeneration with a cell therapy derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

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