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Researchers report growing a mouse embryo using two types of early stem cells.

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image: Suicide Switch for Transplanted Stem Cells

Suicide Switch for Transplanted Stem Cells

By | March 2, 2017

Researchers use an inducible gene to limit tumor growth from human iPSCs transplanted into mice.

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image: How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

By | March 1, 2017

One author's journey through the science of his congenital amusia

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image: Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

By | March 1, 2017

Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | March 1, 2017

Music, the future of American science, and more

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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

By | February 17, 2017

A computer algorithm can identify the brains of autism patients with moderate accuracy based on scans taken at six months and one year of age.

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image: Image of the Day: Mammary Trees

Image of the Day: Mammary Trees

By | February 14, 2017

Long-lived stem cells are activated by ovarian hormones to help grow mammary glands during pregnancy.

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image: Regulators OK Clinical Trials Using Donor Stem Cells

Regulators OK Clinical Trials Using Donor Stem Cells

By | February 6, 2017

Japanese health officials approve human experiments to treat macular degeneration with a cell therapy derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

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The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center researcher links complex traits to the genes that underlie them.

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