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image: Renard's Menagerie

Renard's Menagerie

By | January 1, 2014

Some of the fantastical marine life depicted in a rare, 18th-century book

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Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2014

January 2014's selection of notable quotes

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Contributors

By | January 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: New Species Abound

New Species Abound

By | December 26, 2013

A look at 2013’s noteworthy new species

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image: Top Genomes of 2013

Top Genomes of 2013

By | December 26, 2013

What researchers learned as they dug through the most highly cited genomes published this year

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image: 2013’s Big Advances in Science

2013’s Big Advances in Science

By | December 24, 2013

A roundup of the stunning progress made in the life sciences this year

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image: Week in Review: December 16–20

Week in Review: December 16–20

By | December 20, 2013

Sex lives of early hominins; Amborella trichopoda genome; surface topography and stem cells; how HIV weakens immune cells; dogs, dust microbes, and mouse allergies; news from ASCB

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image: On The Origin of Flowers

On The Origin of Flowers

By | December 19, 2013

The genome of Amborella trichopoda—the sister species of all flowering plants—provides clues about this group’s rise to power.

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image: Surface Texture Influences Differentiation

Surface Texture Influences Differentiation

By | December 18, 2013

The topography of a stem cell’s environment can influence cilia length, which in turn modulates cell signaling and development.

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image: The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

By | December 18, 2013

A newly sequenced Neanderthal genome provides insight into the sex lives of human ancestors.

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