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image: Stem Cells Seek Out Tumors Based on Stiffness

Stem Cells Seek Out Tumors Based on Stiffness

By | July 26, 2017

The technique, demonstrated in mice using engineered mesenchymal stem cells, has potential for both diagnosis and treatment.

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image: Stem Cells in the Hypothalamus Slow Aging in Mice

Stem Cells in the Hypothalamus Slow Aging in Mice

By | July 26, 2017

Once implanted into animals’ brains, neural stem cells that secrete microRNA-containing vesicles seem to contribute to an anti-aging effect.

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image: Opinion: Biobanking Has a Consent Dilemma

Opinion: Biobanking Has a Consent Dilemma

By | July 25, 2017

Is the deep uncertainty surrounding fundamental legal and ethical norms putting biobanks in a precarious position? 

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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Genomic analysis of an oak tree that lived during Napoleon’s time supports the idea that plants somehow avoid the accumulation of mutations in their stem cells.

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A study suggests that “chief” cells in the stomach act as reserve stem cells that are activated by tissue damage and may be the long-sought source of gastric cancer.

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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