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image: What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

By | September 1, 2016

Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.

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image: One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

By | August 31, 2016

Host and bacterial ligands that interact with the same cell-surface receptor induce different activities in human macrophages. 

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image: One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

By | August 26, 2016

Precursor T cells bearing the same antigen receptor adopt two different fates in mice.

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image: Stem Cells Drive Cancer Risk in Mice

Stem Cells Drive Cancer Risk in Mice

By | August 26, 2016

Mutations that arise during stem cell division contribute to the development of cancers in a variety of organs, according to a study.

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image: Zika Infects Adult Neural Progenitors Too

Zika Infects Adult Neural Progenitors Too

By | August 18, 2016

A mouse study shows that the virus has tropism for adult proliferative neural progenitor cells and immature neurons.

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image: NIH Reveals Plan to Fund Human-Animal Chimeras

NIH Reveals Plan to Fund Human-Animal Chimeras

By | August 4, 2016

The public gets to weigh in before the US government lifts its ban on such research.

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image: Nailing Down HAR Function

Nailing Down HAR Function

By | August 1, 2016

A remaining challenge in the study of human accelerated regions (HARs) is establishing their specific functions during development and other biological processes.

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image: Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

By | August 1, 2016

Researchers have designed a screen to find unique molecules, called riboswitches, that determine whether transcription will proceed.

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image: Will Organs-in-a-Dish Ever Replace Animal Models?

Will Organs-in-a-Dish Ever Replace Animal Models?

By | July 19, 2016

Increasingly sophisticated tissue organoids can model many aspects of disease, but animal studies retain a fundamental role in research, scientists say. 

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A 3-D carbon nanotube mesh enables rat spinal tissue sections to reconnect in culture.

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