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image: Tumor Exosomes Make microRNAs

Tumor Exosomes Make microRNAs

By | October 27, 2014

Cellular blebs shed by tumor cells can process short stretches of RNA that go on to induce tumor formation in neighboring cells.

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image: Electromagnetism Promotes Pluripotency: Study

Electromagnetism Promotes Pluripotency: Study

By | October 23, 2014

A paper published last month claims that electromagnetic exposure facilitates cell reprogramming, but some scientists question the evidence.

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image: Lab-Made Insulin-Secreting Cells

Lab-Made Insulin-Secreting Cells

By | October 13, 2014

Researchers craft hormone-producing pancreas cells from human embryonic stem cells, paving the way for a cell therapy to treat diabetes.

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image: Korean Stem Cell Film Tops Box Office

Korean Stem Cell Film Tops Box Office

By | October 9, 2014

A movie based on the Woo Suk Hwang cloning scandal is popular in South Korea, but the plotline strays from reality.

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image: Mom’s Mitochondria Affect Pup Longevity

Mom’s Mitochondria Affect Pup Longevity

By | October 9, 2014

Mitochondrial mutations inherited from the mother can shorten a mouse’s lifespan.

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image: Stem Cell Trial Axed—Again

Stem Cell Trial Axed—Again

By | October 7, 2014

Second review of a controversial stem cell trial in Italy has reached the same conclusion: it’s a no-go.

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image: All Eyes On Stem Cells

All Eyes On Stem Cells

By | October 1, 2014

See the striking images behind the quest to develop stem cell therapeutics for vision disorders.

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image: Cone Cell Correctors

Cone Cell Correctors

By | October 1, 2014

In mice, adult cone cell outer segments and their visual functions deteriorate if two microRNAs are not present.

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image: Eyes on the Prize

Eyes on the Prize

By | October 1, 2014

A handful of stem cell therapeutics for vision disorders are showing promise in early-stage trials, and still more are in development. But there’s a long road to travel before patients see real benefit.  

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image: Nuclear Cartography

Nuclear Cartography

By | October 1, 2014

Techniques for mapping chromosome conformation

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