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image: More Retractions for Fallen Scientist

More Retractions for Fallen Scientist

By | February 7, 2014

Molecular and Cellular Biology pulls five papers from endocrinologist Shigeaki Kato.

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image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch

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image: Stem Cell Lines Not Fit for Clinic

Stem Cell Lines Not Fit for Clinic

By | February 6, 2014

Most stem cell lines registered with the NIH don’t comply with the FDA’s guidelines for human use, according to a new report.  

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image: Judges Side with FDA on Stem Cells

Judges Side with FDA on Stem Cells

By | February 6, 2014

A US federal appeals court maintains that stem cells proliferated in a lab must be regulated as a drug.

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image: Meiosis Maven

Meiosis Maven

By | February 1, 2014

Fueled by her love of visual data and addicted to chromosomes, Abby Dernburg continues to study how homologous chromosomes find each other during gamete formation.

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image: Week in Review: January 27–31

Week in Review: January 27–31

By | January 31, 2014

Stimulus-triggered pluripotency; antioxidants speed lung tumor growth; the importance of seminal vesicles; how a plant pathogen jumps hosts

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image: New Method for Reprogramming Cells

New Method for Reprogramming Cells

By | January 29, 2014

An external stressor, such as low pH or a mechanical squeeze, can send differentiated mouse cells back to a pluripotent state.

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image: Week in Review: January 20–24

Week in Review: January 20–24

By | January 24, 2014

Mistimed sleep disrupts human transcriptome; canine tumor genome; de novo Drosophila genes; UVA light lowers blood pressure; aquatic microfauna fight frog-killing fungus

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image: Bacterial Persisters

Bacterial Persisters

By | January 1, 2014

A bacterial gene shuts down the cell's own protein synthesis, which sends the bacterium into dormancy and allows it to outlast antibiotics.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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